Tadoussac’s history goes back as far as the arrival of the Europeans to the American Continent. In fact, Tadoussac is known to be visited by native people as early as the prehistoric times. The origin of the word “Tadoussac” takes its roots from the Indian natives’ place names. Events which have made the history of Tadoussac are concentrated within three periods, the fur trade (1600 to 1859), the wood industry (1838-1897) and tourism (1864 to today).

In the early 1600’s, the fur trade between the French and American Indians took place. The first trading post was then built by Pierre Chauvin. In 1664, missionaries arrived in Tadoussac, which lead to multiple efforts in convincing passing American Indians to settle down in the village.

Around 1838, William Price built a steam sawmill near l’Anse à l’Eau. That is where the first village hamlet was established in Tadoussac. Houses, warehouses, a bakery and a chapel were built. Around 1850, the first steam ships transporting passengers on the St. Lawrence River and the Saguenay River arrived in Tadoussac.

In 1864, Hôtel Tadoussac opened its doors, marking the beginning of a century of vacationing. In 1927, a ferryboat transporting cars began regular service between Tadoussac and Baie-Sainte-Catherine.

The wooden church located on the property, the Tadoussac chapel - also known as the Indians’ Chapel - was built by Jesuit missionaries in their efforts to convert the Montagnais to Christianity. This chapel is the oldest wooden church in North America and still contains some of the original religious items used when the chapel was first constructed over two and a half centuries ago.

For more than 150 years, visitors have been enjoying what is now known as the most famous landmark in Tadoussac, Hôtel Tadoussac.